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Capitol College to Award 13 Full Scholarships

Capitol College to Award 13 Full Scholarships

Capitol College in Laurel will award full-tuition scholarships to 13 first-year students through the Capitol Scholars Program in the fall with a grant from the National Science Foundation. The scholarships target students who excel in science and technology.  

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Mount St. Mary’s Hosts FEMA’s Emergency Training for Universities

Mount St. Mary’s Hosts FEMA’s Emergency Training for Universities

How would the university respond if a terrorist group set off a bomb in a residence hall - and threatened to detonate more explosives across the campus? Who would work with the police and government agencies racing to investigate? What supplies does the university need to get to the scene? How would panicked parents get information? 

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School of Education partners with Teach for America

School of Education partners with Teach for America

More than 20 percent of new teachers in Baltimore City for the coming school year are from Teach for America, and many will earn their education degree from the Johns Hopkins School of Education. The 2009–2010 TFA class is double the previous year’s total and represents Baltimore City School CEO Andres Alonso’s commitment to the program.  

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Johns Hopkins Passes 100 Mark in Recovery Act Grants

Johns Hopkins Passes 100 Mark in Recovery Act Grants

The Johns Hopkins University has so far won 119 research grants through provisions in the federal stimulus package designed to advance medical and scientific knowledge while kick-starting the U.S. economy. The grants, totaling more than $41 million, will finance investigations ranging from computer-assisted orthopedic surgery to the role that certain proteins play in the development of muscular dystrophy to effective treatments of patients with sickle cell disease.  Just as important, the grants will create jobs at Johns Hopkins and stimulate economic activity throughout the region as university labs purchase supplies and employees spend their paychecks.

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Arts movement alive and well in Station North

Arts movement alive and well in Station North

It's only the beginning for Station North. At this very moment, a walk down North Avenue between St. Paul and Howard streets would give you a cross-section of people that would rival the most diverse in this country. It's an area that's been called a lot of things: Revitalized. Reinvigorated. A Blight on the City. So the question is, with all of this change, why doesn't it seem like gentrification is just around the bend? Art is the answer.

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New GI Bill offers more help with tuition

New GI Bill offers more help with tuition

Beginning next month, members of the military who have served on active duty since the attacks on Sept. 11 might be able to take advantage of a new GI Bill that will pick up the tab for a college degree. The Post- 9/11 GI Bill can cover up to four years of tuition and fees at a public university and help with the cost of private college. 

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Colleges, universities feel the pain: Bad economy translates into lower donations

Colleges, universities feel the pain: Bad economy translates into lower donations

David Sears had high hopes for his first year leading the fundraising office at Loyola College. An $80 million capital campaign had just concluded successfully, and he had all sorts of fresh plans for reaching out to alumni. Then, the stock market plummeted. Nine months later, at the end of its fiscal year, Loyola is confronting a 20 percent drop in annual fund donations. 

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City farming becomes a social cause: MICA students tend crops

City farming becomes a social cause: MICA students tend crops

One student butchered a sheep for her senior project. Another went on to study animal husbandry. Still more found work on vegetable farms. Professor Hugh Pocock taught them all, not at a land grant university but at Maryland Institute College of Art.

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BRAC Higher Education Investment Fund Request for Applications

BRAC Higher Education Investment Fund Request for Applications

For the second year in a row, the Maryland Higher Education Commission is releasing a Request for Applications (RFAs) for initiatives to address the State’s higher education needs related to the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) process. The BRAC Higher Education Investment Fund, administered by MHEC, will fund various programmatic initiatives directly related to BRAC educational needs. 

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Exemplary student chosen to receive Dr. Regina Lightfoot award

Exemplary student chosen to receive Dr. Regina Lightfoot award

Secretary of Higher Education James E. Lyons, Sr., and Mr. Ross Conover, President of the Maryland Higher Education Commission Student Advisory Council (SAC), are pleased to announce that Mr. Justin T. White has been selected as the 2009 recipient of the Regina Lightfoot Student Service Award given by the Maryland Higher Education Commission (MHEC). Justin graduated in May from Loyola College in Maryland with a major in sociology.

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$11M in grants to help to fight nurse shortage

$11M in grants to help to fight nurse shortage

Maryland health care industry leaders began combating an expected nursing shortage Monday with $11 million in grants to area schools to expand their nursing programs.  A shortage of 10,000 nurses is expected to hit the state in 2016, according to the Maryland Hospital Association, but the first round of grants from the campaign will pump millions of dollars into 17 Maryland nursing schools, allowing for more faculty, students and technology.

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MHEC to provide grants to improve teacher quality

MHEC to provide grants to improve teacher quality

The Maryland Higher Education Commission is accepting proposals from institutions of higher education interested in providing teacher training as part of the federal government’s “No Child Left Behind” initiative.  

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Maryland Private Colleges Enlist in the Yellow Ribbon Program

Maryland Private Colleges Enlist in the Yellow Ribbon Program

The Post-9/11 Veterans Education Assistance Act—the most generous veterans’ benefit for higher education since the WWII GI Bill—goes into effect on August 1, 2009. June 15 was the deadline for colleges to sign up for the bill’s Yellow Ribbon Program, which allows colleges to enter into matching agreements with the federal government to cover any difference between the base GI Bill benefit and total tuition and fees. 

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Stevenson University to offer online degree in criminal justice

Stevenson University to offer online degree in criminal justice

Stevenson University will offer a bachelor of science degree in criminal justice starting this fall.  The program will be offered online and will prepare students for careers in law enforcement, security, private and criminal investigations and social work.

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Activist architects at MICA and other colleges design solutions to humanitarian problems

Activist architects at MICA and other colleges design solutions to humanitarian problems

One third of the world's urban population lives in slums. And their numbers could double in the next 30 years, a United Nations report warns, unless swift action is taken to reverse the trend. A movement of socially conscious architects is emerging around the globe with novel ideas for solving the slum problem.  

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Workforce Shortage Grant applications due July 1

Workforce Shortage Grant applications due July 1

Students who are entering or already enrolled in college and want to improve the lives of others in the community by pursuing careers in various areas of public service may be eligible to apply for financial aid from the Maryland Higher Education Commission. 

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Loyola joins SAT-optional colleges

Loyola joins SAT-optional colleges

Loyola College's Jesuit tradition calls for it to serve students who did not start with every economic, social or geographic advantage.  Widespread research, meanwhile, shows that standardized tests such as the SAT and ACT favor those from privileged backgrounds and that such tests are less predictive of college success than excellent grades and a rigorous course load in high school.

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MICA making a strong impression

MICA making a strong impression

To Taylor Fischer, a senior concentrating on illustration at the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) in Baltimore, the term “starving artist” is a foreign concept.

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College and university endowment investments decrease

College and university endowment investments decrease

Ever since the recession started, all Thomas Powell can think about is the future of Mount St. Mary’s University.  As president of the small private college in Emmitsburg, he worries about the institution’s shrinking endowment fund, which dropped from $42 million last June to its current $31 million. The economy, he said, is to blame for the 25 percent loss, and the college’s supporters are seeing their own investments drop in value. 

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BHU’s Last Graduation

BHU’s Last Graduation

It was truly a bittersweet moment for many in the audience May 21 as 15 graduates walked up to the stage at the Park Heights Jewish Community Center to receive their degrees and graduation certificates from Baltimore Hebrew University. 

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TV's 'Stand Up To Cancer" Picks Hopkins Docs

TV's 'Stand Up To Cancer" Picks Hopkins Docs

A TV industry cancer research project has chosen scientists at Johns Hopkins for two of five multi-institutional “dream teams” financed by “Stand Up to Cancer “ grants totaling more than $6 million. The grants, established by the Entertainment Industry Foundation, are funded with $73.6 million raised during a simultaneous, primetime, television broadcast featuring celebrities on ABC, CBS and NBC last September. 

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