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  • Best known for training writers in the footsteps of Sophie Kerr, Washington College now aims to broaden its reputation, using its location by the Chester River to build standing in marine science and research.

  • Students at the Maryland Institute College of Art will get the chance to turn their craft into a business after the Baltimore art school was awarded a three-year, $600,000 grant from the Philip E. and Carole R. Ratcliffe Foundation on Monday. That money will be used to launch Up/Start MICA, a collegewide entrepreneurship program that will work with MICA students and recent graduates.

  • Nursing education is changing as rapidly as the health care profession itself. Patients in hospitals are sicker with more complex medical conditions, and in the community, the patient population is multicultural. Four area programs have adapted to ensure a steady supply of nurses trained for today’s – and tomorrow’s – health care environment. 

  • Bestselling author, Army veteran, and social entrepreneur Wes Moore will deliver the commencement address at Loyola University Maryland’s 164th Commencement Exercises on Saturday, May 21, 2016, at 11 a.m. at Royal Farms Arena. The Work and The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates are New York Times bestsellers. Moore has also authored Discovering Wes Moore, and co-authored the young adult novel, This Way Home, with Shawn Goodman.

  • Too many low-income Marylanders do not reach their full potential, because they fail to enroll at a college that best meets their academic aspirations. Today, Maryland’s independent colleges and universities took a bold step to make college a reality for low-income Marylanders. The Maryland Independent College and University Association (MICUA) and the Maryland Higher Education Commission (MHEC) launched an innovative public/private partnership, known as the Guaranteed Access Partnership Program (GAPP), to reduce college costs and moderate student debt for Maryland high school graduates who lack the financial resources to afford an independent institution.

  • In 2016, Maryland’s independent colleges and universities and the State of Maryland launched the Guaranteed Access Partnership Program (GAPP), a public-private partnership to help close the college affordability gap by supporting capable Maryland high school graduates with financial challenges.  GAPP provides a matching grant award for eligible Guaranteed Access (GA) grant recipients at participating institutions, up to the full cost of tuition and mandatory fees.    

    Click HERE to download the Guaranteed Access Partnership Program (GAPP) Frequently Asked Questions.

  • Photos for media announcement:

  • Too many low-income Marylanders do not reach their full potential, because they fail to enroll at a college that best meets their academic aspirations.  Maryland’s independent colleges and universities and the State of Maryland are creating this public-private partnership to address this pressing problem by closing the affordability gap for capable and financially challenged high school graduates.  

  • McDaniel College junior Mollie Fischer walked from student to student in a fifth-grade classroom at Randallstown Elementary School in Baltimore County, providing support to students, who were given an assignment on the American Revolution requiring them to role-play as delegates in the Second Continental Congress.

  • The Maryland Department of Commerce, Morgan State University and Washington College have endowed $4 million in two new research professorships. The endowments were made through the Maryland E-Nnovation Initiative (MEI), a program created in 2014 to spur basic and applied research in scientific and technical fields at the state’s colleges and universities.

  • A coalition of city officials, two universities and community activists launched a civic partnership Monday to revitalize the part of Baltimore that was at the center of April's riots. 

  • Two local scientists discovered information about a protein that may one day lead to a cure or treatment for a rare neurological disease.

  • When I moved to Baltimore 18 months ago to serve as president of the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA), I came with a conviction that the city's vigorous arts scene and creative endeavors could play an essential role in building a brighter future for Baltimore.

  • In a bid to address Baltimore's chronic ills through the arts, Johns Hopkins University announced Monday it is starting a youth film-making program so urban teens and young adults can portray their community while gaining skills and experience that could land them jobs.

  • As students at universities nationwide protest racism and a lack of minority representation on their campuses, the Johns Hopkins University is launching a $25 million effort to increase the diversity of its faculty. The initiative will establish new procedures for faculty recruitment so a more diverse pool of applicants is considered and will provide money to support visiting faculty members, according to the university.

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